Reopening of Mangattan Museum in Japan

Ishinomori Mangattan Museum in Japan, which was seriously damaged after devastating earthquake and tsunami in 2011, has recently reopened after renewal supported by RUSAL.

The museum has a unique collection of manga works of Mr. Shotaro Ishinomori and remains one of symbols of modern Japanese culture. It sits on the bay facing the Pacific Ocean and Manga Island in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan. Mangattan Museum is also one of the most attended sights in Ishinomaki region.

After the earthquake and destructive tsunami that attacked Japan on 11 March 2011, Ishinomori Mangattan Museum was in a poor state and needed serious renewal. The museum was not included in the governmental rehabilitation program, and to help restoring Mangattan Museum independent philanthropists came. UC RUSAL was one of them, transferring a sizable donation as part of its initiative to support victims of the disaster.

Ishinomori Mangattan Museum became a symbol of the city's reconstruction, combining the efforts of museum administration, non-profit organizations and numerous volunteers.

The re-opening ceremony of Mangattan museum was held on 23 March 2013. Mr. Arase Yasuo, Head of RUSAL's office in Japan, took part in the ceremony wishing Ishinomori Mangattan Museum well-being, prosperity and numerous visitors. He also claimed with certainly that Mangattan Museum would keep its status as one of the most spectacular examples of the Japanese culture.

About Ishinomori Mangattan Museum

Manga is an important part of Japanese culture and identity. Ishinomori Mangattan Museum was founded in 1991 in Ishinomaki City and became one of the main attractions not only on a municipal, but also on a national scale. The museum is dedicated to the famous manga creator, Mr. Shotaro Ishinomori, who was born and raised in Miyagi Prefecture, as well as to the history of Japanese manga. Due to the large collection of manga works gathered in the museum, the port city of Ishinomaki became famous throughout Japan, attracting up to 180,000 annually.